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Jeonju Bibimbap Tour

When in Jeonju, it’s ok to have bibimbap for breakfast, lunch, and dinner! Why? Because, first, Jeonju Bibimbap is really that good, and second, the ‘personality’ of each bibimbap restaurant is different. In this post, we’ll visit two renowned bibimbap restaurants in town.


Gajok Hoegwan

This bibimbap of Gajok Hoegwan seems more like a work of art than just food. I cannot appreciate enough the harmony of the vivid colors within the brassware and the delicate balance of different flavors. The head chef of Gajok Hoegwan is Master Kim Nyun-im. She holds several government-acknowledged titles for her mastery of bibimbap. She’s said to take the utmost care in the preparing the best ingredients. Even the length of spiced spinach must be taken into consideration.

Each ingredient is free of artificial seasonings. The rice is cooked with cow bone broth. Also, at Gajok Hoegwan, a bowl of bibimbap is served with 17 different side dishes. So eating Jeonju Bibimbap at Gajok Hoegwan feels like a feast. I really loved the inflated steamed egg and the patented pickled seaweed. When mixing bibimbap, I recommend using the egg yellow.

Gajok Hoegwan
Jeollagamyoung 5gil 17, Wansangu, Jeonju

 

Sungmidang

If you’re curious what the authentic Jeonju Bibimbap (before it became popular) was like, I recommend visiting Sungmidang. This is the first place to offer bibimbap, which opened more than half-a-century ago. So how’s Sungidang’s Jeonju Bibimbap different from others? With the usual bibimbap, different ingredients are placed over the white rice. However, at Sungmidang, the ingredients are placed over the roughly broiled mix of rice, bean sprouts, and gochujang (spicy red chilli pepper paste). The flavor is enhanced by the home-made gochujang and sesame oil.

The Jeonju Bibimbap of Sungmidang comes with 10 side dishes. The most popular side dish is hwangpomook (mung bean jelly). I prefer to pair the bibimbap of Sungmidang with a glass of moju (rice wine boiled with nine different oriental medicinal ingredients including ginseng, cinnamon, ginger, deer horn, and more). Sungmidang runs two venues, one in Jungang District (headquarter) and the other in Seosin District.

Sungmidang
Jeollagamyoung 5gil 19-9, Wansangu, Jeonju

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  • Steve Joe

    The food looks really generous!

  • Jared Sandler

    Informative blog post about two well-known Jeonju City Bibimbap restaurants. Gajok Hoegwan’s assortment of 17 offered side dishes are incredible. Perhaps resembles a Han-Jeong-Shik type of meal. Also enjoyed the author’s description of moju. I wonder if moju rice wine originated in Jeonju City. If it did, a future blog post about moju would be fantastic!

  • Ever Enrique Castillo Osorio

    Bibimbam is one of the most famous food in Korea. I like because it has lot of vegetables hehe

  • Rachid

    WOW ! I LOVE BIBIMBAP so much
    bibimbap is not only delicious, it also contains a wealth of nutrients such as cellulose and vitamins while being low in cholesterol and fat. Such healthy dishes are ideal for all but especially so for busy students as well as hardworking individuals always on the go.
    There was a longstanding tradition among ancestors that any leftover food on New Year’s Eve was not to be kept into the New Year. For this reason, the practice of mixing various ingredients in a bowl with rice was started. Koreans are also known to cook many different dishes to pay respects to their ancestors on major holidays such as the Lunar New Year and Chuseok. Since there is a lot of food leftover on these occasions, people enjoy mixing them.

  • Abbey Fox

    So much fun trying authentic bibimbap in Jeonju! I especially liked sampling all the different banchan, like hwangpomook (mung bean jelly).

  • Jared Sandler

    Informative blog post about two well-known Jeonju City Bibimbap restaurants. Gajok Hoegwan’s assortment of 17 offered side dishes are incredible. Perhaps resembles a Han-Jeong-Shik type of meal. Also enjoyed the author’s description of moju. I wonder if moju rice wine originated in Jeonju City. If it did, a future blog post about moju would be fantastic!